Kalendarz

Kwi
20
wt
🌓 First Quarter Moon
Kwi 20@8:59 am – 8:59 am
Kwi
22
czw
Lyrids Meteor Shower
Kwi 22 – Kwi 23 całodniowy

A fairly bright moon will interfere with this fairly average shower, so try to catch it in the very early morning after the moon has set. The Lyrids can be counted on for about 20 meteors per hour at its peak. It is produced by dust particles left behind by comet C/1861 G1 Thatcher, which was discovered in 1861. The shower runs annually from April 16-25. It peaks on the night of the night of the 22nd and morning of the 23rd. These meteors can sometimes produce bright dust trails that last for several seconds. Meteors will radiate from the constellation Lyra, but can appear anywhere in the sky.

Kwi
27
wt
🌕 Full Moon
Kwi 27@5:31 am – 5:31 am

This is also the first of three „supermoons” for 2021, with the moon making a closer-than-usual pass by earth. (It will be closest during the next new moon… when you can’t see it.)

In the northern hemisphere, this full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Pink Moon because it marked the appearance of the moss pink, or wild ground phlox, which is one of the first spring flowers. This moon has also been known as the Sprouting Grass Moon, the Growing Moon, and the Egg Moon. Many coastal tribes called it the Fish Moon because this was the time that the shad swam upstream to spawn.

In the southern hemisphere this might be the Full Harvest Moon. The harvest of all crops usually gets into full swing in April, along with hunting to stock up the meat cellars. This could easily be called The Full Hunters Moon, or it might be named for a specific fruit that’s prominent in the region, or an animal that’s plentiful and commonly sought for meat.

Maj
3
pon
🌗 Last Quarter Moon
Maj 3@9:50 pm – 9:50 pm
Maj
6
czw
Eta Aquarids Meteor Shower
Maj 6 – Maj 7 całodniowy

The second quarter moon will block out some of the faintest meteors this year. But if you are patient, you should still should be able to catch quite a few good ones. Best viewing will be from a dark location after midnight.

The Eta Aquarids is an above average shower, capable of producing up to 60 meteors per hour at its peak. Most of the activity is seen in the Southern Hemisphere. In the Northern Hemisphere, the rate can reach about 30 meteors per hour. It is produced by dust particles left behind by comet Halley, which has known and observed since ancient times. The shower runs annually from April 19 to May 28. It peaks this year on the night of May 6 and the morning of the May 7. Meteors will radiate from the constellation Aquarius, but can appear anywhere in the sky.

Maj
11
wt
🌑 New Moon
Maj 11@9:00 pm – 9:00 pm
Maj
17
pon
Mercury Is Back Again!
Maj 17@11:00 am – 12:00 pm

Did you miss seeing Mercury in March? Didn’t want to wake up early to see it in the morning sky? Here’s your second chance. Mercury will be at its highest point above the horizon in the evening sky. Look for the planet low in the western sky just after sunset.

Maj
19
śr
🌓 First Quarter Moon
Maj 19@9:13 pm – 9:13 pm
Maj
26
śr
Total Eclipse of the Moon!
Maj 26@11:45 am – 2:53 pm

It’s been a while! The last lunar eclipse was in 2019. The Earth’s shadow will completely cover the Moon.

The Moon will barely edge into total eclipse for just 14 minutes and 30 seconds. With the Moon just barely inside the Earth’s umbral shadow, the Moon may be quite bright, but even so, this should be worth seeing for observers from the western Americas, the Pacific, Australia, and south-east Asia. The partial eclipse will last for 3 hours and 7 minutes in total. During this eclipse the Moon will be at perigee, making it extremely large. At maximum eclipse it will be 0.567° in apparent diameter, which is 6.7% larger than average.

https://moonblink.info/Eclipse/eclipse/2021_05_26

🌕 Full Moon
Maj 26@1:14 pm – 1:14 pm

This is also the second of three supermoons for 2021. The Moon will be near its closest approach to the Earth and may look slightly larger and brighter than usual. (6% bigger than average.)

In the northern hemisphere, this full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Flower Moon because this was the time of year when spring flowers appeared in abundance. This moon has also been known as the Corn Planting Moon and the Milk Moon.

In the southern hemisphere, this is the Full Frost Moon, or the Fall Moon. By this time of the year, the Southern Hemisphere begins it’s turn to winter. Fall has arrived and the air is chilled during the day and cold during the night. A ripe time for dew to settle on the land and turn to frost.